U.S. Postal Service celebrates Hot Wheels’ 50th

FORT WORTH, TX — In celebration of Hot Wheels’ 50th Anniversary, the U.S. Postal Service issued a pane of 20 Forever stamps showcasing some of the classic toy car’s most outrageous designs. The stamps were issued during the Goodguys 26th Summit Racing Lone Star Nationals at Texas Motor Speedway.

For the first time, Hot Wheels are commemorated on Forever stamps for fans of all ages to enjoy. Arranged in diagonal rows, the 20 stamps showcase photographer Len Rizzi’s images of 10 Hot Wheels cars — two of each design — speeding along the recognizable bright orange track.

“Today, we make history as the Postal Service and our partners at Mattel are celebrating the 50th anniversary of Hot Wheels with these dynamic stamps showcasing the iconic toys that were a part of my childhood and that of my children,” said USPS Marketing Vice President Steve Monteith, who served as the dedicating official. “These miniature works of art truly capture the thrill and excitement of these legendary vehicles and now will speed their way as Forever stamps on millions of cards and letters.”

Joining Monteith at the ceremony were Harry Davies, vice president, Event Operations, Goodguys Rod and Custom Association;  Ricardo Briceno, director, Global Brand Marketing, Hot Wheels; and Deborah Ferguson, “NBC5 Today” anchor.

Each stamp features the name of the vehicle shown in one of the top corners and the words “USA” and “Forever” in one of the bottom corners. The well-known Hot Wheels logo appears in the top right corner of the pane. The back of the pane displays the Hot Wheels’ 50th anniversary logo.

The Hot Wheels cars depicted are:
Top row (left to right):

• The aptly named Purple Passion (1990), a super sleek metallic purple and green model. The car remains a favorite of collectors.

• Equipped with a roof-mounted rocket, the Rocket-Bye-Baby (1971) is one of the most aggressive racers in Hot Wheels history. 

• Perfect for Halloween, the spooky Rigor Motor (1994) is a coffin-shaped hot rod that is powered by a huge engine adorned with two skulls. 

• A spectacularly powerful version of a classic muscle car, the Rodger Dodger (1974) has a giant engine bursting out of its hood.

• With a twin turbo V6 hybrid engine and wide front air intakes built to look like a predatory fish, the Mach Speeder (2018) is a true 21st-century racer.

Bottom row (left to right):

• The Twin Mill (1969) is one of the most iconic Hot Wheels cars of all-time. The speed machine features dual big-block engines. 

• The distinctive Bone Shaker (2006) is a hot rod with a fierce-looking skull for a grille. The car has a massive short-block engine made to rattle your bones.

• The HW40 (2008), a car introduced to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Hot Wheels, features a jet turbine engine. The space-age vehicle features a futuristic glass hood.

• The original surfboard-toting Deora (1968) was included in the first Hot Wheels line. The souped up Deora II, showcased on the stamp, came out in 2000.

• The Sharkruiser (1987) is a carnivore on wheels. The completely unique design features fins, a tail, a sharp-toothed grille and a roaring V8 engine.

William J. Gicker was the project’s art director. Greg Breeding designed the stamps.

Hot Wheels History

Hot Wheels was born when Mattel co-founder Elliot Handler challenged his design team — which included a General Motors car designer and a rocket scientist — to create a toy car that was cooler and performed better than anything on the market. Mattel soon introduced its bright orange tracks, which provided children unlimited ways to test out stunts and racing skills. The Hot Wheels toy line expanded rapidly. Since the inception of Hot Wheels, Mattel has produced thousands of varieties of cars. In 2011, Hot Wheels was inducted into the National Toy Hall of Fame. Today, children and parents alike still love racing the eye-poppin’, colorful, lightning-fast cars.

Postal Products

Customers may purchase stamps and other philatelic products through the Postal Store at , by calling 800-STAMP24 (800-782-6724), by mail through USA Philatelic, or at Post Office locations nationwide. Forever stamps will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail 1-ounce price. Information on ordering first-day-of-issue postmarks and covers is at  under “Collectors.” A video of the ceremony will be available on .

The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.

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